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Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

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Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2024: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


January 28

The Japanese government-issued Philippine peso was a fiat currency issued in the Philippines during World War II, by the occupying Japanese government. One of several examples of Japanese invasion money, the currency was issued in several denominations and was known by some Filipinos by the derogatory term "Mickey Mouse money". The effect of wartime hyperinflation towards the end of the war can be seen in the rapid increase of denomination values that were put into circulation. These thirteen banknotes were issued in ten denominations from one centavo to one thousand pesos by the Japanese government and are now part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Empire of Japan

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January 27

Hope II

Hope II is a oil-on-canvas painting with added gold and platinum by the Austrian Symbolist artist Gustav Klimt, created in 1907–1908. It depicts a pregnant woman with closed eyes, with a human skull representing death appearing from behind her stomach – perhaps a sign of the dangers of labour. At the foot of the painting, three other women bow their heads, as if praying or mourning. The square painting measures 110.5 centimetres (43.5 in) on each side, and is now in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Painting credit: Gustav Klimt


January 26

Little bee-eater

The little bee-eater (Merops pusillus) is a species of bird in the bee-eater family, Meropidae, found in sub-Saharan Africa. The bird has green upper parts with a yellow throat, black gorget, and rich brown upper breast fading to buffish ochre on the belly, while the beak and legs are black.This little bee-eater of the subspecies M. p. argutus was photographed by the Linyanti River in Nkasa Rupara National Park, Namibia.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp

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January 25

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle is a castle in Edinburgh, Scotland. It stands on Castle Rock, which has been occupied by humans since at least the Iron Age. Serving as a royal residence for the Kingdom of Scotland from the 12th century or earlier until 1633, Edinburgh Castle was involved in many historical conflicts from the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century to the Jacobite rising of 1745. Few of the present buildings pre-date the Lang Siege of the 16th century when the medieval defences were largely destroyed by artillery bombardment. The most notable exceptions are St Margaret's Chapel (which dates from the early 12th century and is regarded as the oldest building in Edinburgh), the Royal Palace, and the early-16th-century Great Hall. The castle also houses the Scottish regalia, known as the Honours of Scotland, and is the site of the Scottish National War Memorial and the National War Museum. Some of the castle buildings house regimental museums that contribute to its presentation as a tourist attraction. This image shows a view of Edinburgh Castle from the nearby Grassmarket, taken by the Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson between 1865 and 1885.

Photograph credit: George Washington Wilson; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 24

Sharon Tate

Sharon Tate (January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969) was an American actress and model. During the 1960s, she appeared in advertisements, small television roles and as an extra in films, before appearing in her first major role as Jennifer North in the 1967 film Valley of the Dolls, which earned her a Golden Globe Award nomination. That year, she also performed in the film The Fearless Vampire Killers, directed by her future husband Roman Polanski. On August 9, 1969, Tate and four others were murdered by cult members of the Manson Family in the home she shared with Polanski. She was eight and a half months pregnant at the time of her death. Her last completed film, 12+1, was released posthumously in 1969. This publicity photograph of Tate was released by 20th Century Fox for Valley of the Dolls.

Photograph credit: 20th Century Fox; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 23

"Daisy" is an American political advertisement that aired on television as part of Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presidential campaign against Barry Goldwater. Though officially aired only once, on September 7, 1964, it is considered a turning point in political and advertising history. It was designed to broadcast Johnson's anti-nuclear positions, contrary to Goldwater's stance. The commercial begins with Monique Corzilius, a three-year-old girl, picking the petals of a daisy while counting from one to ten incorrectly. After she reaches "nine", a booming male voice is heard counting the numbers backward from "ten", similar to the start of a missile-launch countdown. The scene is replaced by a nuclear explosion, with Johnson's voice-over stating: "We must either love each other, or we must die." Although the Johnson campaign was criticized for frightening voters by implying that Goldwater would wage a nuclear war, various other campaigns since have adopted and used the "Daisy" advertisement.

Advertisement credit: Lyndon B. Johnson 1964 presidential campaign


January 22

Along the River During the Qingming Festival

Along the River During the Qingming Festival is a 12th-century painting attributed to Zhang Zeduan. The original painting captures the daily life of people from the Song dynasty at the capital, present-day Kaifeng. This picture shows a 1736 remake of the painting, which updates the scenery to include Qing-dynasty motifs and shows the influence of Western painting techniques, executed by five artists from the Painting Academy and active at the Qing court.

Painting credit: Chen Mei, Sun Hu, Jin Kun, Dai Hong and Cheng Zhidao, after Zhang Zeduan


January 21

Rega

Rega is a private, non-profit air rescue service that provides emergency medical assistance in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. It was established in 1952 by Rudolf Bucher, who believed the Swiss rescue organization needed a specialized air sub-section. This image is a sequence photograph, stitched from 207 separate frames, of Rega's rescue helicopter Da Vinci in operation in Stoos, Switzerland.

Photograph credit: Roy Egloff


January 20

Persicaria maculosa

Persicaria maculosa, also known as spotted lady's thumb, Jesusplant and redshank, is an annual plant in the buckwheat family. It is widespread across Eurasia from Iceland south to Portugal and east to Japan. It is also present as an introduced and invasive species in North America, where it was first noted in the Great Lakes region in 1843 and has now spread through most of the continent. P. maculosa grows up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) tall and features small pink flowers with a perianth of four or five lobes, fused near the base. It flowers from July to September in the temperate Northern Hemisphere.

Photograph credit: The Cosmonaut


January 19

Lady with an Ermine

The Lady with an Ermine is a portrait painting widely attributed to the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci. Dated to around 1489 to 1491, the work is painted in oils on a panel of walnut wood. Its subject is Cecilia Gallerani, a mistress of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan; Leonardo was painter to the Sforza court in Milan at the time of its execution. It is the second of only four surviving portraits of women painted by Leonardo, the others being Ginevra de' Benci, La Belle Ferronnière, and the Mona Lisa. The painting now hangs in the Czartoryski Museum in Kraków, Poland.

Painting credit: Leonardo da Vinci


January 18

Eureka Inn

The Eureka Inn is a hotel in Eureka, California, built in the Elizabethan Tudor Revival architectural style. Opened in 1922, it was purchased in 1960 by Helen Barnum, the matriarch of a successful timber family in the county, before being sold to John Biord after Barnum's death in 1993. In 2004, the inn was closed after tax defaults by its owner, reopening in 2010 after the businessman Libo Zhu purchased and refurbished it. In February 1982, the structure was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This photograph shows the Eureka Inn's entrance hall as seen in 2020.

Photograph credit: Frank Schulenburg


January 17

Kanayi Kunhiraman

Kanayi Kunhiraman (born 1937) is an Indian sculptor. Born in the state of Kerala, he studied sculpture at the Government College of Fine Arts in Chennai, where he came into contact with abstract painter K. C. S. Paniker, at the time part of the college's faculty. After a stint teaching at the Ethiraj College for Women, Kunhiraman moved to England for a three-year course at the Slade School of Fine Art. On his return to Kerala, he undertook a number of assignments and in 1976 became head of the sculpture department at College of Fine Arts Trivandrum. He went on to become the college's principal, remaining until 1978 when he became the chair of the Kerala Lalithakala Akademi. This portrait photograph of Kunhiraman was taken in 2019.

Photograph credit: Mullookkaaran


January 16

Macracantha

Macracantha is a genus of orb-weaver spider containing a single species, M. arcuata. It is found in India and China and through Southeast Asia to Borneo. The females of this genus have tough, shell-like abdomens armed with three pairs of spines. The middle spines project upward and outward, curving in toward each other along their length, and have a length of 20 to 26 millimetres (0.79 to 1.02 in), whereas the abdominal width is only 8 to 9 millimetres (0.31 to 0.35 in). The female's front and rear spines are short and roughly equal in length. The male of the species measures only 1.5 millimetres (0.059 in), with stout, conical spines. This photograph shows a M. arcuata spider in Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand.

Photograph credit: Rushen


January 15

Satellite animation of the ash plume and shockwave produced by Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai

The 2021–22 Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai eruption and tsunami was a volcanic event caused by Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai, a submarine volcano in the Tongan archipelago in the southern Pacific Ocean. Beginning in December 2021, the eruption reached a large and powerful climax on 15 January 2022. Described by scientists as a "magma hammer", the volcano produced a series of four underwater thrusts at the height of the eruption, displaced 10 cubic kilometres (2.4 cu mi) of rock, ash and sediment, and generated the largest atmospheric explosion recorded by modern instrumentation. The eruption caused tsunamis along the Pacific rim. This animation, depicting the initial ash plume and shockwave produced by Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai on 15 January 2022, was created by the Japan Meteorological Agency from sixteen photographs taken at ten-minute intervals by the Japanese weather satellite Himawari 8.

Animation credit: Japan Meteorological Agency


January 14

Kaleva Church

Kaleva Church is a church of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland in the district of Liisankallio in Tampere, Finland. Designed by Reima and Raili Pietilä, the building was constructed between and 1964 to 1966. It was constructed using slip forming, with seventeen narrow 35-metre-high (115 ft) hollow concrete U-shapes and full height windows between them. The walls were cast in twelve days. The floor plan of the church resembles a fish, an ancient symbol of Christianity.

Photograph credit: Kallerna


January 13

Chugach State Park

Chugach State Park is a state park covering a hilly region immediately east of Anchorage, in the south-central area of the US state of Alaska. At 495,204 acres (2,004 square kilometers) in area, it is the third-largest state park in the country, and rises to an elevation of 8,005 feet (2,440 meters) at Bashful Peak, its tallest point.

Photograph credit: Poco a poco


January 12

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite is a carbonate mineral with the chemical composition MnCO3 (manganese carbonate). In its (rare) pure form, it is typically a rose-red color, but can also be shades of pink to pale brown. It streaks white, and its Mohs hardness varies between 3.5 and 4.5. Its specific gravity is between 3.45 and 3.6. The mineral is formed by oxidation of manganese ore, and is found in South Africa, China and South America. It is Argentina's national gemstone, and was named as the official state gemstone by the U.S. state of Colorado in 2002. This photograph shows a rhodochrosite specimen on a matrix that originated from Peru.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


January 11

Plate carrée projection

The plate carrée projection is a map projection in which the horizontal coordinate is the longitude and the vertical coordinate is the latitude. The name derives from the French for "flat square". The plate carrée is a special case of the equirectangular projection, which has been in use since the earliest days of spherical cartography: the Roman mathematician Ptolemy attributed its invention to Marinus of Tyre, in around AD 100. This composite satellite image, titled "Blue Marble", was produced by NASA and shows Earth's land surface, shallow water and shaded topography.

Photograph credit: NASA


January 10

Della H. Raney

Della H. Raney (January 10, 1912 – October 23, 1987) was an American nurse. Raney was the first African American nurse to report for duty in World War II, and the first to be appointed chief nurse. In 1944, she became the first black nurse affiliated with the Army Air Corps promoted to captain, and was later promoted to major in 1946. Raney retired from the Army in 1978. This photograph of Raney seated behind her desk was taken in 1945; at the time, she headed the nursing staff at the station hospital at Camp Beale in California.

Photograph credit: United States Office of War Information; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 9

Woodpecker

Woodpeckers are a group of birds in the family Picidae, which also includes the piculets, wrynecks, and sapsuckers. Members of this family are found worldwide, except for Australia, New Guinea, New Zealand, Madagascar, and the extreme polar regions. Most species live in forests or woodland habitats, although a few species are known that live in treeless areas, such as rocky hillsides and deserts, and the Gila woodpecker specialises in exploiting cacti. This photograph shows a female campo flicker (Colaptes campestris), a woodpecker species native to South America, in the Pantanal, Brazil.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


January 8

Elephant's Trunk Nebula

The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust within the much larger ionized gas region IC 1396 located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light-years away from Earth. The combined action of the light from the massive star ionizing and compressing the rim of the cloud, and the wind from the young stars shifting gas from the center outward led to very high compression in the nebula. This pressure has triggered the current generation of protostars. This photograph of the Elephant's Trunk Nebula was taken with a 127 mm (5.0 in) refracting telescope.

Photograph credit: Chuck Ayoub


January 7

Helena Hill Weed

Helena Hill Weed (1875–1958) was an American suffragist, and a member of the National Woman's Party. The daughter of Connecticut congressman Ebenezer Hill, she studied geology at Vassar College and the Montana School of Mines before joining the suffragist movement. In 1917, she became one of the first women to be arrested for picketing the White House, having carried a banner stating "Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed". She served three days in prison for this, and was apprehended again in January 1918 for applauding in court, for which she served a day in jail. In August of that year she was arrested for participating in the pro-suffrage Lafayette Square meeting at which her sister Elsie Hill spoke, for which Helena served fifteen days.

Photograph credit: Harris & Ewing; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 6

Bay Area Rapid Transit

Bay Area Rapid Transit is a rapid transit system serving the San Francisco Bay Area in California. It serves fifty stations along six routes on 131 miles (211 kilometers) of rapid transit lines, including a spur line to Antioch that uses diesel multiple unit trains, and an automated guideway transit line to Oakland International Airport. The system had 26,026,800 passengers in 2021. This photograph, captured by a line-scan camera using strip photography, shows the length of a nine-car Bay Area Rapid Transit train comprising four C1 cars and five B2 cars.

Photograph credit: Daniel Lawrence Lu


January 5

Hip, Hip, Hurrah!

Hip, Hip, Hurrah! is an oil-on-canvas painting from 1888 by the Danish painter Peder Severin Krøyer. The work shows various members of the Skagen Painters, a group of Danish, Norwegian and Swedish artists who formed a loose community in Skagen, at the northern tip of Jutland, in the 1880s and early 1890s. Krøyer began the painting in 1884 after a party at Michael Ancher's house, with the composition inspired by photographs taken at the celebration by the German artist Fritz Stoltenberg, although the individuals featured are not all the same. A dispute arose between Krøyer and Ancher the following day when the former returned uninvited to continue work on the piece, and although they reconciled Krøyer was not permitted to use Ancher's garden as the setting. The Swedish art collector Pontus Fürstenberg bought the painting before it was completed, and it was displayed at Charlottenborg in 1888. He later donated the work to the Gothenburg Museum of Art, where it has hung since.

Painting credit: Peder Severin Krøyer; image edited by Chris Woodrich and Acabashi


January 4

Chalcolestes viridis

Chalcolestes viridis, also known as the willow emerald damselfly and the western willow spreadwing, is a species of damselfly in the family Lestidae. Featuring a metallic green body, it has an elongated abdomen and pale brown spots on its wings and resides in areas of still water with overhanging trees. This photograph of a male C. viridis damselfly perching on a twig was taken in Mannheim, Germany, in 2017.

Photograph credit: Andreas Eichler


January 3

Sepia-toned portrait of Lucretia Mott

Lucretia Mott (January 3, 1793 – November 11, 1880) was an American Quaker, abolitionist, women's rights activist, and social reformer. This autographed photograph of Mott was taken by the Philadelphia-based photographer Frederick Gutekunst around the 1870s, and is in the collection of the National Woman's Party. The image was twice published in issues of The Suffragist in 1920.

Photograph credit: Frederick Gutekunst; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 2

A pressurized water reactor is a type of nuclear reactor used to generate nuclear power. It works by placing nuclear fuel in a reactor pressure vessel, which is then engaged in a controlled fission chain reaction, producing heat. This heats water in the primary coolant loop by thermal conduction through the fuel cladding. The hot primary coolant is pumped into a heat exchanger called the steam generator, where it flows through several thousand small tubes. Heat is transferred through the walls of these tubes to the lower pressure secondary coolant located on the sheet side of the exchanger where the secondary coolant evaporates to pressurized steam. This transfer of heat is accomplished without mixing the two fluids to prevent the secondary coolant from becoming radioactive. This digital animation was produced by the Tennessee Valley Authority, a federally owned electric utility corporation in the United States, and narrates the operation of a pressurized water reactor.

Animation credit: Tennessee Valley Authority


January 1

Schloss Favorite, Ludwigsburg

Schloss Favorite is a maison de plaisance and hunting lodge built in the Baroque style in Ludwigsburg, Germany. It is located on a rise, directly north of Ludwigsburg Palace and connected via an avenue to it. This panorama of Schloss Favorite, taken in January 2017, was stitched from eight separate photographs captured from the avenue linking it to the palace. The building is shown in a snow-covered clearing in the woods, framed by bare trees lining the avenue.

Photograph credit: Julian Herzog


December 31

Composite map of Palestine assembled from sheets produced by the Survey of Palestine and the Survey of Israel

The Survey of Palestine was the government department responsible for the survey and mapping of Palestine during the period of British Mandatory Palestine. The survey department was established in 1920 in Jaffa, and moved to the outskirts of Tel Aviv in 1931. It established the Palestine grid. In early 1948, the British mandate appointed a temporary director general of the Survey Department for the impending Jewish state; this became the Survey of Israel. The maps produced by the survey have been widely used in "Palestinian refugee cartography" by scholars documenting the 1948 Palestinian exodus, notably in Salman Abu Sitta's Atlas of Palestine and Walid Khalidi's All That Remains. This composite map of the region of Palestine was assembled from twenty-four separate 1:100,000 sheets published by the Survey for Palestine and its successor, the Survey of Israel, between 1942 and 1958.

Map credit: Survey of Palestine and the Survey of Israel; assembled by DutchTreat

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December 30

Green–Meldrim House

The Green–Meldrim House is a historic house at 14 West Macon Street, on the northwest corner of Madison Square, in Savannah, Georgia. Built in 1853, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. The house is owned by the adjacent St. John's Church, which offers tours and uses it as a meeting and reception space. This 1864 sketch by William Waud depicts the entrance hall of the Green–Meldrim House, which was then in use by General William Tecumseh Sherman as his headquarters during the American Civil War. Waud's illustration was adapted into an engraving for the January 21, 1865, issue of Harper's Weekly.

Illustration credit: William Waud; restored by Adam Cuerden

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Picture of the day archives and future dates

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2024: January February March April May June July August September October November December